September 3, 2014
http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2013/09/i-can-do-it.html

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2013/09/i-can-do-it.html

September 1, 2014
"Lady Chatterley’s Daughter" - 1960

"Lady Chatterley’s Daughter" - 1960

August 1, 2014
"When machinery ran wild - when order became chaos - bedlam uncontrolled…"

"When machinery ran wild - when order became chaos - bedlam uncontrolled…"

July 31, 2014
"Edie had been a gang girl since she was twelve" - 

"Edie had been a gang girl since she was twelve" - 

July 29, 2014

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/the-rebels.html

Carlisle PA July 7th 1864

My Dear Wife:

The rebels are coming. They are now at Greencastle, with a force of a thousand men, and it is said that they have 40 thousand behind them. In all probability, we shall have them here. We …?… union force to oppose them. Our men from the Barracks and the Rebels had a big fight in the streets of Hagerstown. At first our men drove them back, but they got reinforcements  and drove our men to Greencastle. You ought to have been here last night to witness the boxing up of our merchants and others. The niggers and whites are flying in every direction, and everybody is intent on saving their things.

Don’t be alarmed about me. I will take care of myself. I don’t intend to leave Carlisle for any infernal Rebel south. I shall stay at the Parsonage and if that Doctor I met with at Gettysburg comes here and fulfills his promise to see me “about our affair of honor” he will not get beyond our threshold. I have my revolver prepared, and will blow his brains out the moment he enters.

It is said they are conscripting our men as they go and preparing them into their arm service from 16 to 50 years of age. We have all resolved not to be conscripted  - to die first. The 12,000 militia for 100 days are responding fast, and I hope we shall be able to give them a sound thrashing before they got back to the Potomac.

I believe they take all they want from private houses. Oh my poor pigs! We have concluded to put them in the ??ary while the rebels are here, and feed them on funds of deposit. And as for our blankets, we shall take good care of them. Now don’t be alarmed, if we should not meet again on earth we certainly shall in heaven. It will be for better for me to say here than to leave: and it may be that the Rebels will not be so harsh as …?.

I am very glad you and the children are away. I hope to see you at the time we appointed. There will be no doubt a great battle in our valley. What our government is doing is a matter of secrecy, but I have no doubt plans are being laid to defeat the enemy. Several men from the barracks have been brought in wounded, and several rebel prisoners ..? through here. Love to all. Write immediately. God bless you all, if we never meet again on earth, we shall meet in Heaven.

Your devoted,
S.Philips

July 26, 2014
Forgotten Bookmarks turned 5 today!

Yay

Forgotten Bookmarks turned 5 today!

Yay

July 24, 2014

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/the-battlefield.html

Letters & envelopes I picked up from the battlefield of Gettysburg the day after the battle
Samuel Philips

July 22, 2014
http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/raise-and-recruit.html
Headquarters - Pennsylvania Militia, Inspector General’s DepartmentHarrisburg, August, 1864To H.H.C. KaySir: You are hereby authorized to raise and recruit a Company Squadron of Volunteer Cavalry under the provisions of General Order No. 1, of these Head-quarters, of August 30, 1864, issued in pursuance of the authority of the Acts of Assembly of the 22nd and 25th August, 1864, and the act to which they are supplements, authorizing the formation of the Pennsylvania State Guard. Samuel ToddInspector General, Penn’a

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/raise-and-recruit.html


Headquarters - Pennsylvania Militia, Inspector General’s Department

Harrisburg, August, 1864

To H.H.C. Kay

Sir: You are hereby authorized to raise and recruit a Company Squadron of Volunteer Cavalry under the provisions of General Order No. 1, of these Head-quarters, of August 30, 1864, issued in pursuance of the authority of the Acts of Assembly of the 22nd and 25th August, 1864, and the act to which they are supplements, authorizing the formation of the Pennsylvania State Guard. 

Samuel Todd
Inspector General, Penn’a

July 21, 2014

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/your-affectionate-husband.html

Chambersburg PA - Aug. 1st 1862

Dear Rebecca:

Your very welcome letter reached me yesterday evening. I was much pleased to learn that you and Mr. Campbell had made all things right. I received a letter from him yesterday in which he states that Mr. Hapler (?) was perfectly satisfied. I can now rest. The fact is I was entirely too hasty, at least I  had no grounds to complain because my quarters salary (?) was not due, although they should have interested themselves more to raise the money by the time I left.

I have been very well since I left. I put up with Mr. Clarke where I remained over night. Last night I started with Mr. Waupler (?) and during the day I ran about almost every where. The (?) are all glad to see me. I was at Wanamakers, thye don’t take their bereavement as hard as I thought they would. They intend to move to Philadelphia in about 3 weeks. I saw Capt. Gillan, and could have wept over him. He is in the last stage of consumption, and is not able to go to church any more. I don’t think he will last beyond fall. I dined yesterday with Judge Nill….(?) But I can’t go into particulars until I see you.

All the young men here have joined the army. They want me to because (?) Chaplain which I think I will do. Henry Hutton, Ben. La(?) George W (? likely same name as above), James Maxwell, John Oaks, Jeff Nill are among the numbers.

But I will now close. When we meet I can give you more satisfaction. I will be at Carlisle on Monday morning. If anything happens let me know. My love to the family, I accept a great portion from (?)

Your affectionate husband,
Samuel Philips

July 15, 2014
ewspaper clipping, no date or other information. With a little research, I found that it appeared in the February 7, 1976 edition of The New York Times. As you can imagine, the words hit home for me, seems like I go through this ritual almost every day.
People picked over Josephine Oliengo Paglieri’s belongings Thursday night. Her books, furniture and clothes were strewn about the sidewalk and street, lying in the snow.Mrs. Paglieri, who operated Enrico and Paglieri Restaurant after her husband, Paulo, had died in 1950, lived in a small flat over the restaurant at 64 West 11th Street for 50 years.The restaurant, which opened in 1908, went out of business last year. But Mrs. Paglieri continued to live in the apartment with the same desk, bureau and bed she had had for 60 years, until she died last November, at the age of 95.On Thursday, Mrs. Paglieri’s friends cleared the apartment of her personal possessions and left them on the sidewalk to be picked up by the Sanitation Department. Presently, a young hippie came by, grabbed one of her battered suitcases and began to stuff her old books into it. He hastily selected the few leather-bound ones. Applying The Crusher "You’re a fast worker," said his female companion. She lived next door, near Fifth Avenue, and was dressed in a fur coat.Somebody else rummaged through Mrs. Paglieri’s worn dresses. “These are great for old clothes,” she said. Other people peered inside the drawers of Mrs. Paglieri’s plain wooden bureau.That night a large sanitation truck rumbled up the street to pick up the goods. An old olive-green velvet couch crumbled under the tongs of the truck’s crusher.The desk fell apart when the garbage men tried to pick it up. A lifetime of personal papers, letters, souvenirs and stationery swirled all over the sidewalk outside the restaurant that Mrs. Paglieri used to own. The sanitation men shoveled and swept, and threw them inside the truck. But one photograph remained on the street behind the vehicle. It was a picture of Mrs. Paglieri as a young girl, with her family. The driver of the sanitation truck picked it up. He glanced at it while the desk was splintering under the weight of the garbage. He hopped into he cab and roared off, leaving a few papers fluttering in the wind.
Found in “The Silver Arrow” by Earl H. Reed. Published by Reilly and Lee, 1926.

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/picked-over.html

ewspaper clipping, no date or other information. With a little research, I found that it appeared in the February 7, 1976 edition of The New York Times. As you can imagine, the words hit home for me, seems like I go through this ritual almost every day.

People picked over Josephine Oliengo Paglieri’s belongings Thursday night. Her books, furniture and clothes were strewn about the sidewalk and street, lying in the snow.

Mrs. Paglieri, who operated Enrico and Paglieri Restaurant after her husband, Paulo, had died in 1950, lived in a small flat over the restaurant at 64 West 11th Street for 50 years.

The restaurant, which opened in 1908, went out of business last year. But Mrs. Paglieri continued to live in the apartment with the same desk, bureau and bed she had had for 60 years, until she died last November, at the age of 95.

On Thursday, Mrs. Paglieri’s friends cleared the apartment of her personal possessions and left them on the sidewalk to be picked up by the Sanitation Department. Presently, a young hippie came by, grabbed one of her battered suitcases and began to stuff her old books into it. He hastily selected the few leather-bound ones. 

Applying The Crusher 

"You’re a fast worker," said his female companion. She lived next door, near Fifth Avenue, and was dressed in a fur coat.

Somebody else rummaged through Mrs. Paglieri’s worn dresses. “These are great for old clothes,” she said. Other people peered inside the drawers of Mrs. Paglieri’s plain wooden bureau.

That night a large sanitation truck rumbled up the street to pick up the goods. An old olive-green velvet couch crumbled under the tongs of the truck’s crusher.

The desk fell apart when the garbage men tried to pick it up. A lifetime of personal papers, letters, souvenirs and stationery swirled all over the sidewalk outside the restaurant that Mrs. Paglieri used to own. 

The sanitation men shoveled and swept, and threw them inside the truck. But one photograph remained on the street behind the vehicle. It was a picture of Mrs. Paglieri as a young girl, with her family. 

The driver of the sanitation truck picked it up. He glanced at it while the desk was splintering under the weight of the garbage. He hopped into he cab and roared off, leaving a few papers fluttering in the wind.



Found in “The Silver Arrow” by Earl H. Reed. Published by Reilly and Lee, 1926.

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/picked-over.html

July 3, 2014
Giving away my two books:

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/thursday-giveaway-forgotten-bookmarks.html

Giving away my two books:

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/07/thursday-giveaway-forgotten-bookmarks.html

July 2, 2014
“A couple of pals, cardigan and pullover, really hit the headlines when they’re handknit. “

A couple of pals, cardigan and pullover, really hit the headlines when they’re handknit. “

June 26, 2014

1905 “Works of the Brontë Sisters” - Thornton Edition

June 25, 2014
Newspaper clipping.Written in pencil is “My Richard” and “Friday, June 5, 1931.”The article details the suicide of a young man who feared that “poor eyesight would bar him from the Military Academy at West Point.”Found pasted in “The People’s Praise Book” edited by Henry Sanders and George C. Lorimer. Published by A.S. Barnes and Co., 1889.http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/06/my-richard.html

Newspaper clipping.

Written in pencil is “My Richard” and “Friday, June 5, 1931.”

The article details the suicide of a young man who feared that “poor eyesight would bar him from the Military Academy at West Point.”

Found pasted in “The People’s Praise Book” edited by Henry Sanders and George C. Lorimer. Published by A.S. Barnes and Co., 1889.

http://www.forgottenbookmarks.com/2014/06/my-richard.html

June 19, 2014
coverspy:

It’s the fiiiinal countdown! Have you signed up for Queer Ladies Literary Speed Dating yet? It’s NEXT Tuesday at housingworksbookstore at 7pm. Register here.

coverspy:

It’s the fiiiinal countdown! Have you signed up for Queer Ladies Literary Speed Dating yet? It’s NEXT Tuesday at housingworksbookstore at 7pm. Register here.